28 C
Makati City
Sunday, July 23, 2017
2014, GE Appliances launched FirstBuild to augment the strengths of a long-established company with those of an entrepreneurial start-up. Separation is the key. As a free-standing enterprise operating under its own brand, FirstBuild is decidedly not another attempt to transform a traditional company’s corporate culture. The FirstBuild facility is located on...
As consumers in a data-driven world, we’ve come to expect highly personalized sales experiences tailored to our specific needs. Companies like Netflix and Uber have set the tone, giving us what we want, when we want it. Business-to-business buyers expect the same personalized treatment that they get from Amazon.com. And sales...
In the 2017 Edelman Trust Barometer survey, only 37 percent of global respondents said they trusted their CEOs, continuing the pattern of low trust in recent years. The results are worrisome because trust in leaders is linked to employee retention, compliance with strategy and unit performance. Trust trickles up, however,...
Your starting salary serves as an anchor throughout your career. Starting too low could be a costly mistake. Don’t let these 10 common myths hold you back at the negotiating table. 1. I don’t have experience, so I have no bargaining power. At this point in the hiring process employers...
Tim Cook recently confirmed that Apple is working on “autonomous systems”—which likely include cars. I see three different ways that Apple could use an autonomous car in the marketplace. 1. As a Trojan horse to sell more iPhones. Imagine a Tesla-like Apple car seamlessly integrated with the Apple ecosystem and,...
By Chris Zook & James Allen Rapidly growing companies—especially unicorns like Uber—face a high risk of stumbling. The term “unicorn” was coined to describe a rarity: In 2011 there were just 28 early-stage companies, still privately owned, with investment valuations of $1 billion or more. Today there are more than 200...
By Steve W. Martin Why does a salesperson lose a sale? To identify the factors that help close a sale, we surveyed more than 230 buyers. Here are our six main findings: 1. Some customers want to be challenged. Forty percent of study participants prefer a salesperson who listens, understands and...
By Walter Frick Amazon.com’s grand ambition was on display earlier this month with the announcement that it will acquire Whole Foods for $13.7 billion. The move raises the question faced first by booksellers, then the rest of the retail business, and now seemingly everyone: How can you compete with Amazon? The retail...
By Andy Boynton Human-centered design focuses on customer empathy, ethnographic research and rapid prototyping. “Stagecraft”, a related approach, fakes a new product or service to get real-life reactions from users early in the development process. It uses all the tricks of theater and film to fool an audience into believing...
By Anil Gupta and Haiyan Wang The rise of economic nationalism has led many observers to announce that globalization is not just in retreat, but near death. The Brexit vote and the election of Donald J. Trump (as well as the popularity of various far-right European politicians) raise questions about the...
By Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic and Clarke Murphy Over and over again, organizations are unable to appoint the right leaders. Although there are many reasons for this state of affairs—including overreliance on intuition at the expense of scientifically valid selection tools—a common problem is organizations’ inability to predict whether leaders will fit...
By George Serafeim & Sakis Kotsantonis On June 1 the world listened as President Donald J. Trump proclaimed that the US would withdraw from the Paris climate accord. Such a move might lead some companies and investors to assume that “business as usual” is now the most likely climate scenario. We...
By Jonathan Woetzel & Scott Nyquist Historically, the resources sector followed a dig-and-deliver model, where success was mainly about the size and quality of assets. For example, the oil industry depended on having the most plentiful reserves. But that’s no longer the case. Today, how producers manage their resources is...
By Niraj Dawar ABOUT one-third of all advertising dollars are now spent online. Google, the dominant force in this space, pulls in about half of that expenditure as revenue. The key selling proposition of online advertising is its ability to connect the dots between ad exposures and purchases. Google has a more...
By Davide Taliente & Constanze Windorfer Political sentiment has turned against globalization. Brexit, the election of Donald J. Trump and the rise of nationalist parties across Europe are signs of this new political mood. And as this mood is translated into policy, the structural advantages of multinational corporations are coming under...
By Ndubuisi Ekekwe For decades, African governments have tried policy methods to improve farm productivity. But most farmers are still only marginally improving their yields. In some Igbo communities in Nigeria, where I live, it’s common for farmers to plant according to the phases of the moon and attribute variability...
John Van Reenen & Christina Patterson In most countries, labor’s share of the national income has declined for about three decades. Why? Maybe the cause is “Robocalypse Now”—firms replacing expensive people with cheaper machines. Or maybe Chinese imports have caused employers to outsource employment. However, China itself is experiencing a labor share...
By Michael Sulmeyer For years, major businesses have contended with hackers. In the recent past, that threat mostly came from China. Now, a resource-rich, risk-taking gang of hackers linked to Russia are rampant. The Russian security services have extensive ties with the criminal underworld, and whether their hackers are working for...
By Anthony Rjeily & Charlie Jacco Most of us are overwhelmed by the numerous passwords (and associated security questions and protocols) by which we access our online accounts. Asking your customers to keep track of ever more complicated login information is a terrible user experience. And the prevalence of hacking proves...
By Maxwell Wessel, Aaron Levie & Robert Siegel When the great companies of the industrial era were founded, economists believed in the law of diminishing marginal returns: The more of something that is made, the less valuable each incremental unit of that something becomes. That all changed in the internet era....
-Advertisement
- Advertisement -
-
Advertisement
Advertisement