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Makati City
Monday, May 22, 2017
John Van Reenen & Christina Patterson In most countries, labor’s share of the national income has declined for about three decades. Why? Maybe the cause is “Robocalypse Now”—firms replacing expensive people with cheaper machines. Or maybe Chinese imports have caused employers to outsource employment. However, China itself is experiencing a labor share...
By Michael Sulmeyer For years, major businesses have contended with hackers. In the recent past, that threat mostly came from China. Now, a resource-rich, risk-taking gang of hackers linked to Russia are rampant. The Russian security services have extensive ties with the criminal underworld, and whether their hackers are working for...
By Anthony Rjeily & Charlie Jacco Most of us are overwhelmed by the numerous passwords (and associated security questions and protocols) by which we access our online accounts. Asking your customers to keep track of ever more complicated login information is a terrible user experience. And the prevalence of hacking proves...
By Maxwell Wessel, Aaron Levie & Robert Siegel When the great companies of the industrial era were founded, economists believed in the law of diminishing marginal returns: The more of something that is made, the less valuable each incremental unit of that something becomes. That all changed in the internet era....
By Alessandro Di Fiore In 1848 San Francisco newspaperman Samuel Brannan announced that gold had been found in California. In the gold rush that followed, more than 300,000 people headed to the area to make their fortunes. More than 150 years later, there’s still a gold rush in California—this one in...
By Joelle Emerson There’s growing skepticism about whether unconscious bias training is an effective tool for meeting corporate diversity goals. Critics of such training contend that it doesn’t move the needle on diversity numbers, and can even backfire. Some academic studies support this perspective: One longitudinal study found that traditional...
By Tony McCaffrey Artificial intelligence (AI) is disturbing the work force. But can AI ultimately do the job better than humans? IBM’s Watson is now helping with cancer research and tax returns, among other things. And AlphaGo, a computer program designed to play the ancient board game “Go”, beat Lee Sedol,...
By Michelle L. Zorn, Patricia Norman, Frank C. Butler & Manjot Bhussar During the Great Recession of 2008, companies around the world downsized. American firms alone laid off more than 8 million workers from 2008 to 2010. Even in healthier financial times, such as now, firms often downsize to reduce...
By Leonard L. Berry In the aftermath of the United Airlines fiasco when security personnel forcibly removed a paying customer from his plane seat to make room for one of the airline’s employees, here are some lessons that any service company should heed. Honor customers’ “perceived contract”, not the company’s...
By Scott McDonald When the public and politicians see businesses as agents or enemies of social policy, businesses must respond. President Donald J. Trump won the US presidency by promising to protect Americans from the ravages of international trade and immigration and by threatening punitive action against firms that use offshore...
By Scott Kirsner When a CEO announces a major initiative to foster innovation, mark your calendar. Three years later, many of these ambitious ventures will have quietly expired without an obituary. Large companies don’t lack for good ideas. And early data often shows that customers are willing to pay for them....
By Liane Davey Have you been putting off a difficult conversation? The longer you wait, the more obscured the facts will become. Without objective examples, the conversation is more likely to stray into emotional and judgmental territory. Also, a delay begs the response, “Why didn’t you tell me sooner?” If you deliver...
By Richard Straub & Julia Kirby How do we get more people involved in solving problems? Everybody is capable of creative thought and action. And great managers know how to tap that superabundant resource. They recognize that pooling creative energy accelerates progress—many minds make lighter work. But for this to happen, more...
By Alejandro Ruelas-Gossi Too often CEO’s find themselves stuck in what I call an innovation plateau—a chronic sameness of approach. I’ve identified four symptoms: Obsession with cost reductions. Lean is powerful, but having the “exact” number of people for today’s work jeopardizes the future by not leaving “extra” people to...
By Vivek Bapat Banyans are among the world’s largest and longest-living trees. Not surprisingly, the banyan’s visual distinctiveness has come to symbolize magnificence, immortality and stature—attributes associated with strong leadership. There are good reasons this metaphor is so popular. Like the banyan, many well-regarded leaders get their start by capitalizing on...

Homophobia at the Office

By Thomas Roulet TO better understand the causes and consequences of homophobia in the workplace, we interviewed 18 gay and lesbian auditors in the Big Five accounting firms in France and followed up with them over the course of two years. The good news is that our study revealed no obvious...
By Matthew E. Kahn & Daxuan Zhao Photos by Christian Åslund & The Norwegian Polar Institute In our new paper for the National Bureau for Economic Research, we argue that the presence of climate skeptics reduces the aggregate demand for products that help with climate adaptation—which means that innovative companies are...
By Denise Lee Yohn Wal-Mart’s recent decision to offer free two-day shipping for online orders, no membership required, is the latest in a series of moves that the company has made to fight Amazon.com and grow its e-commerce business. Last year Wal-Mart  purchased Jet.com and installed Jet’s founder, Marc Lore,...
By Paul Leinwand & Vinay Couto The best-run companies think of cost management as a way to support their strategies, and of costs as precious investments that fuel their growth. They put their money where their strategy is and cut bad costs to redirect resources toward good ones. Management teams at...
By Kon Leong United States Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart once said, “Ethics is knowing the difference between what you have the right to do and what is right to do.” New data technologies have blurred those boundaries. Corporations can now collect an unprecedented amount of unstructured data—the data created by...
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