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Makati City
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
Cars are getting bigger. For years motorists worldwide have been abandoning four-door sedans in favor of bulkier SUVs.   Carmakers have become bigger, too. Four car companies now make around 10 million vehicles a year in order to reap economies of scale, particularly in the mass-market sector of the business,...
By Andrew Ross Sorkin If you were to look for one ingredient that binds together the nation’s chief executives, top managers and boards of directors, you’d find a remarkably consistent commonality, now and in generations past: A disproportionate number of them are graduates of Harvard Business School. An MBA from HBS,...
By Jonathan Soble & Paul Mozur Toshiba, a pillar of the modern Japanese economy whose roots stretch back to the country’s industrial stirrings in the 19th century, warned on Tuesday that a disastrous foray into nuclear power may have crippled its business beyond repair. In a stock-market filing in Japan, Toshiba said...
Norway offers much to envy. The food is tasty, public services are great and the people are impossibly good-looking. Its trade policy looks equally desirable. Though it trades heavily with the European Union, Norway also can strike trade deals all over the world, either on its own or operating in...
A glimpse into the future of retailing is available in a smallish office in Hamburg. From there Otto, a German e-commerce merchant, is using artificial intelligence to improve its activities. The company already is deploying the technology to make decisions at a scale, speed and accuracy that surpass the...
By Chad Bray The accounting firm KPMG has fired six employees, including the head of its US audit practice, after it learned they were given improper warnings ahead of planned audit inspections by its regulator, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board. KPMG said that an individual who had joined the firm...
By Michael J. De La Merced For years, corporate chieftains have spoken wistfully of wanting to bring home the more than $2 trillion in cash US companies have socked away overseas—if it weren’t for tax rates of close to 40 percent. Under President Donald Trump and a Republican-controlled Congress (even one...
By Andrew Ross Sorkin Repealing Obamacare. Reforming the tax system. Spending big on infrastructure. One by one, President Donald Trump’s campaign promises seem to be less likely—or at least won’t happen on the timetable he anticipated. So, why are so many chief executives and investors still seemingly bullish about a...

The Myth of Cyber-Security

Computer security is a contradiction in terms. Consider the past year alone: Cyberthieves stole $81 million from the central bank of Bangladesh. The $4.8-billion takeover of Yahoo by Verizon was nearly derailed by two enormous data breaches. Russian hackers interfered in the American presidential election. Away from the headlines, a...
DONALD TRUMP won the White House on the promise that government is easy. Unlike his Democratic opponent, whose career had been devoted to politics, Trump stood as a businessman who could Get Things Done. Enough voters decided that boasting, mocking, lying and grabbing women were secondary. Some Trump fans even...
By Ellen Rosen LIKE other Silicon Valley giants, Facebook has faced criticism over whether its work force and board are too white and too male. Last year, the social media behemoth started a new push on diversity in hiring and retention. Now, it is extending its efforts into another corner: the...
By Landon Thomas Jr. SCORE one for the machines. The largest fund company in the world, BlackRock, has faced a thorny challenge since it acquired the exchange-traded fund business from Barclays in 2009. These low cost, computer-driven funds have exploded in growth, leaving in the dust the stock pickers who had...
By Alexandra Stevenson IT is rare that William A. Ackman, the brash activist investor, apologizes for anything. As a successful hedge fund manager, Ackman has made billions of dollars for himself and his investors with bold and counterintuitive bets. But recently he conceded that his firm’s biggest wager yet—on Valeant Pharmaceuticals...
TO bring House Republicans good luck in passing their replacement for the Affordable Care Act, a.k.a. Obamacare, Rep. Pete Sessions (R.-Texas) wore a brown suit to the chamber, in honor of President Ronald Reagan. After the vote was pulled from the House floor, Republicans in Washington moved on to the...
Amazon is an extraordinary company. The former bookseller accounts for more than half of every new dollar spent online in America. It is the world’s leading provider of cloud computing. This year Amazon probably will spend twice as much on television as HBO. Its own-brand physical products include batteries,...
By Andrew Ross Sorkin Just a few days after being sworn in as president, Donald Trump convened a meeting at the White House of some of the nation’s most prominent chief executives to discuss how to improve manufacturing. Trump was joined by Elon Musk of Tesla, Mark Fields of Ford,...
According to a document crafted by the Trump administration, a model trade agreement has 24 elements. Second on the list is “trade-deficit reduction,” giving a hint as to why Trump wants to review America’s existing agreements. In January Sean Spicer, his press secretary, said that the administration would “re-examine...
By Nathaniel Popper The big banks and Silicon Valley are waging an escalating battle over your personal financial data, including the amount you spent on dinner last week and how much you are paying for your mortgage. Technology startups like Mint and Betterment have been building services that pull together your...
One big question has lurked throughout the euro crisis: Should one or more members quit? Could they? The most obvious candidate is Greece, the country where the trouble began. It never met the criteria for joining, but its deficit and debt figures were misrepresented. The crisis has inflicted agonies on...
By Landon Thomas Jr. For nearly 20 years, Adam Lerrick, a conservative economist, has been a vocal scold of global organizations like the International Monetary Fund, arguing that such institutions burn through taxpayer money and foster an insular culture of elitism, bailouts and scant accountability. Now, Lerrick, a former investment banker...
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